Lucky Watercress & Lime Soup

Lucky Watercress & Lime Soup

Question: What does a 7-course Irish meal usually consist of?
Answer: A boiled potato and a 6-pack of Guinness :-)

Actually, truth be told, Irish cuisine has come a long way. In celebrating my Irish heritage this month, I’ve decided to highlight a few Irish-inspired recipes and share them with you. This recipe, Watercress & Lime Soup, is not mine (but I have tweeked it). It comes from a lovely Irish cookbook called The Irish Isle.

A couple of things I like about this cookbook – One, it comes paired with an adorable traditional Irish Music CD. And secondly, the cookbook highlights the recipes of talented Irish chefs featuring New Irish Cuisine served at popular castles, manor houses and country house hotels around the Irish isle. I chose this particular recipe because it’s served at the Ashford Castle, the castle my sisters and I stayed at when we visited the mothercountry for the very first time.

Watercress runs wild in Ireland. It’s been used in Irish cooking since ancient times. The lime in this recipe gives it a wonderful tanginess. Hope you like it!

Lucky Watercress & Lime Soup
Serves: 6
 
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 leek (white part only), chopped
  • 1 cup diced, peeled celery root
  • 6 cups vegetable stock
  • 10 ounces de-stemmed watercress (or 5 oz. watercress & 5 oz. baby spinach)
  • ½ cup non-dairy cream (optional)
  • Juice of 2 small limes
Instructions
  1. In a large soup pot over medium-low heat, heat oil. Add onion, leek and celery root and cook until tender, about 7 minutes.
  2. Stir in vegetable stock and simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in the watercress, raise the heat to high, and bring to a boil.
  3. Puree the soup using a handheld blender (or transfer to a food processor). Gently stir in cream and lime juice until well blended.
Notes
Adapted from The Irish Isle


Comments

  1. says

    Mmm, wonderfulness! This soup is gorgeous, Trish! And I know the flavors all rock together :-) What’s also great is the simplicity of it. I love simple recipes. I’ve been making more of them as of late, probably because I’m jammed for time with school. But, finals are next week so, I look forward to taking a break. Perhaps I’ll make some of this soup when the weather cools (if it does) back down! Happy Fat Tuesday and International Women’s Day, Trish :-)

    • says

      Hi Trish – I must tell that the name of this soup got me! Lucky? I adore this, I bet the soup was wonderful. I know you didn’t invent it, but did you give it the lucky adjective?
      Lime + watercress = great paring of two foods. Kudos to you for sharing, and Happy Upcoming St. Paddy’s Day.
      LL

  2. says

    Looks very fresh! Neat to have recipes with special meaning and origin :) I’ve never tried celery root before, what does it taste like?

    • says

      While celery root may certainly not be the best looking vegetable, it has the wonderful zesty flavors of celery and parsley. If you like celery, you’ll like this root veggie. Thanks for reading :-)

  3. says

    I love the use of celeriac instead of the more traditional potato in this soup. I’m sure that it and the lime juice give the soup a really unusual flavour. You’ve got me intrigued although, being of Irish descent too, I don’t know if I could forego the potato!!

  4. says

    I would never have pegged this soup as Irish. It was the lime and cheese that threw me. I’ll trust the Irish woman and Irish cookbook, though! Someday, if so lucky, we’ll visit Ireland, eating and drinking and soaking up the history (and that green!) as we go along. In the meantime, I have some fresh-baked mini soda breads (thanks to your suggestion) and a killer soup recipe to make soon. Plus I could use some serious luck in searching for a job when we move to NC in a few months…

    Cheers,

    *Heather*

  5. says

    What a great St. Patrick’s Day recipe, Trish! This soup is so full of color and flavor, and your photos are just lovely. I bet it would be wonderful with a hunk of Irish soda bread! Thanks for sharing. You have a beautiful blog and I’m looking forward to exploring your recipes. :)

  6. says

    What a creative recipe!! I’ve never even heard of watercress soup – I usually just use watercress in sandwiches or salads – but this is a much cooler way to prepare it :) Looking forward to trying this out – thanks for sharing!

    • says

      I took some classes a longgg time ago in high school but mostly just messed around with the camera. I use a 50mm lens sometimes and a 18-55mm lens other times. I find natural lighting works best. Thanks for asking, Kristen :-)

    • says

      I so glad to see other delicious Irish recipes. Every Irish dish I’ve eaten, I’ve loves. The soup looks fresh, healthy and so delicious. I’ll keep an eye out for more of your Irish recipes. Thanks for educating us :)

  7. says

    I’ll admit, I don’t know a lot about Irish cuisine but I want to now. These flavors sound fantastic. I love watercress but have never cooked it. Thank you for this.

  8. says

    This soup looks so yummy and would be perfect on this cold day in Boston. Your photos are stunning! My daughter asked me not to make our usual corned beef and cabbage for St. Patrick’s Day so maybe I’ll make this soup…

  9. Aine says

    thx Trish. I found your post while looking for healthy vegetarian recipes from Ireland for our school intercultural day on Friday. I’m from Galway, live in Spain and just back from home and feeling a bit overwhelmed by meat meals!

Trackbacks

  1. [...] more Irish recipes, check out my Mini Soda Breads with Fig and Date, Classic Irish Soda Bread, and Watercress & Lime Soup. var a2a_config = a2a_config || {}; a2a_config.linkname=”Leek Champ”; [...]

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